compliment

[ noun kom-pluh-muhnt; verb kom-pluh-ment ]SEE DEFINITION OF compliment
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR COMPLIMENT

Thank you for the compliment, but I don't expect to stick to it all my life.

She laughed her little laugh of pleasure, and thanked him prettily for the compliment.

They are angry also, as I understand, with my mother, for returning his compliment.

"I can make a horse do what I want," he said, delighted at the compliment.

But Mr. Gladstone, while acknowledging the compliment, declined because of his age.

"That is not much of a compliment to us," said Linda slowly.

Again Betty, foolish girl, flushed with pleasure at the compliment.

Is it a compliment to ask you if you would do me the honour, sir, to—'

Madame Defarge received it as a compliment, and looked at her husband.

The brothers, as merry as she herself, were obliged to compliment her.

WORD ORIGIN

"An act, or expression of civility, usually understood to include some hypocrisy, and to mean less than it declares" [Johnson], 1570s, complement, via French compliment (17c.), from Italian complimento "expression of respect and civility," from Vulgar Latin *complire, for Latin complere "to complete" (see complete (adj.)), via notion of "complete the obligations of politeness." Same word as complement but by a different etymological route; differentiated by spelling after 1650.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR COMPLIMENT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.