Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BUFFOON

Do not fancy you can be a detached wit and avoid being a buffoon; you cannot.

She had made him a laughing-stock, a buffoon, a political joke.

As dictator, he is a buffoon; let him make himself emperor, he will be grotesque.

Martyrdoms were represented on the stage, the martyr being the buffoon.

They are at San Antonio—the baker, the buffoon, the two young men who dig.

He was the buffoon, who went by a woman's name, Nastasya Ivanovna.

She said and felt at that time that no man was more to her than Nastasya Ivanovna, the buffoon.

A buffoon expression has this advantage, it is unanswerable.

But the buffoon should have most of it, to support his higher dignity.

He was a universal actor—comedian, tragedian, buffoon—all in one.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, "type of pantomime dance;" 1580s, "clown," from Middle French bouffon (16c.), from Italian buffone "jester," from buffa "joke, jest, pleasantry," from buffare "to puff out the cheeks," a comic gesture, of echoic origin. Also cf. -oon.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BUFFOON

Philistine

nounboor
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.