Synonyms for dare

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DARE

Now, Mr. Bines, I like him and I dare say you've done the best thing for him, unusual as it was.

He has all his housework there, a broom and a duster, and I dare say he has a cooking-stove and a gridiron.

Yet the superscription is of his dictating, I dare say, for he is a formal wretch.

This, I dare say, will make them alter their behaviour to you.

I have no friend but you to whom I can appeal, to whom I dare complain.

But after all, I dare say there will be no need but to shew your faces in my company.

We dare not forget today that we are the heirs of that first revolution.

And so, my fellow Americans, we must be strong, for there is much to dare.

If there had been no deep affection between us I should not dare to ask you.

Dare you to wear your brother's coat without the crescent which should stamp you as his cadet.

WORD ORIGIN

from first and third person singular of Old English durran "to brave danger, dare; venture, presume," from Proto-Germanic *ders- (cf. Old Norse dearr, Old High German giturran, Gothic gadaursan), from PIE *dhers- "to dare, be courageous" (cf. Sanskrit dadharsha "to be bold;" Old Persian darš- "to dare;" Greek thrasys "bold;" Old Church Slavonic druzate "to be bold, dare;" Lithuanian dristi "to dare," drasus "courageous").

An Old English irregular preterite-present verb: darr, dearst, dear were first, second and third person singular present indicative; mostly regularized 16c., though past tense dorste survived as durst, but is now dying, persisting mainly in northern English dialect. Meaning "to challenge or defy (someone)" is first recorded 1570s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DARE

accost

verbapproach for conversation or solicitation
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.