Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CALL

"I shall not call upon you to do that," said the lawyer, kindly.

You know I am your banker, and it is only natural for you to call upon me.

I cannot recall the precise amount, but it was not so much as what you call one dollar.

If you will leave the matter in my hands, I will call upon him to-night, and see what I can do.

It is to me more what you call a 'beast-garden,' to include all species of fauna.

"Call me Mr. Davis, if you please," said Halbert, haughtily.

He hates to go, but he says it's his duty; the call is so loud.

“We must call Kit into counsel, ere we can do that fully,” said Stephen.

We travel from place to place in our own little locomotives which we call automobiles.

They formed the name of Darheush the King, whom we call Darius.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English ceallian "to call, shout," less common than clipian; replaced by related Old Norse kalla "to cry loudly," from Proto-Germanic *kallojanan (cf. Dutch kallen "to talk," Old High German kallon "to call"), from PIE root *gal- "to call, scream, shriek, shout" (cf. Sanskrit garhati "bewail, criticize;" Latin gallus "cock;" Old High German klaga, German Klage "complaint, grievance, lament, accusation;" Old English clacu "affront;" Old Church Slavonic glasu "voice," glagolu "word;" Welsh galw "call"). Related: Called; calling.

Meaning "to give a name to" is mid-13c. Coin-toss sense is from 1801. Meaning "to visit" (Middle English) was literally "to stand at the door and call." Telephone/telegraph sense is from 1889. To call out someone to fight (1823) corresponds to French provoqueur. To call it a day is from 1834.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CALL

accost

verbapproach for conversation or solicitation
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.