Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BLAST

In despair he looked at her as she flew along, as if carried away by the blast.

Then we went back to the smithy to wait the result of the blast.

Suddenly he heard the blast of a horn close by, then the baying of hounds.

Virile nations are not made by theories or by the blast of the trumpet.

With song and halloo and blast of horns, they swept away into the forest.

To condemn the past is in the same breath to blast the future.

It was as if a cold wind, a blast from the charnel-house, had swept through the car.

The plane lurched and reeled as the blast of the explosion reached it.

Twisted around by the blast, Jon fell helplessly to the floor.

Why, blast their miserable, stingy—What do they take me for?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English blæst "blowing, breeze, puff of wind," from Proto-Germanic *bles- (cf. Old Norse blastr, Old High German blast "a blowing, blast," German blasen, Gothic blesan "to blow"), from PIE *bhle- "to blow," probably a variant of root *bhel- (2) "to blow, inflate, swell" (see bole).

Meaning "explosion" is from 1630s; that of "noisy party, good time" is from 1953, American English slang. Sense of "strong current of air for iron-smelting" (1690s) led to blast furnace and transferred sense in full blast "the extreme" (1839). Blast was the usual word for "a smoke of tobacco" c.1600.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BLAST

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.