Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR NOISES

Yes, surely she had been in that hell of noises with him—fighting too.

The candles had grown paler, and the noises of the street were drowned in the music of the organs.

The noises of the camp were painful to his ear, and in the forest he found peace.

No harm seemed to come of it, while the noises the gods made were certainly not threatening.

The static emerging from the speaker thickened, obliterating all other noises.

Then the noises of Kinesma were not only permitted, but encouraged.

And for a time she was not conscious where she was, and heard none of the noises round about her.

A musician might extract some harmony from this chaos of noises, this jumble of sounds.

Then there was a tremendous noise to end all noises, and the ship began to climb.

When the wind blows these noises are reenforced by a hundred others.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "loud outcry, clamor, shouting," from Old French noise "din, disturbance, uproar, brawl" (11c., in modern French only in phrase chercher noise "to pick a quarrel"), also "rumor, report, news," apparently from Latin nausea "disgust, annoyance, discomfort," literally "seasickness" (see nausea).

Another theory traces the Old French word to Latin noxia "hurting, injury, damage." OED considers that "the sense of the word is against both suggestions," but nausea could have developed a sense in Vulgar Latin of "unpleasant situation, noise, quarrel" (cf. Old Provençal nauza "noise, quarrel"). Meaning "loud or unpleasant sound" is from c.1300. Replaced native gedyn (see din).

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.