Antonyms for blow-up

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BLOW-UP

The parish had said long ago they would come to a blow-up some time.

"He's been having rather a blow-up with Violet," explained Claudia.

Cheese got meddling with dangerous substances, and there was a blow-up.

Guess it wasnt much of a blow-up, remarked Ned in somewhat disappointed tones.

But for anyone that wanted to fool around a blow-up like mine that match was rubbish.

Theres already a theory among some of the workmen that the blow-up just isnt going to happen, ever.

The great ship seemed to leap into countless tremendous fragments, each rushing away from the point of the blow-up.

Then his face went blank as he recalled the blow-up wed had that mornin gettin the pack ponies contented with their loads.

Then came the blow-up, and it turned out that his well was just a dry hole in the ground.

But the children continued to play and day after day went by, and no blow-up took place.

WORD ORIGIN

"move air," Old English blawan "blow, breathe, make an air current; kindle; inflate; sound a wind instrument" (class VII strong verb; past tense bleow, past participle blawen), from Proto-Germanic *blæ-anan (cf. Old High German blaen, German blähen), from PIE *bhle- "to swell, blow up" (cf. Latin flare "to blow"), possibly identical with *bhel- (2) "to blow, swell" (see bole).

Meaning "to squander" (of money) is from 1874. Sense of "depart suddenly" is from 1902. Slang "do fellatio on" sense is from 1933, as blow (someone) off, originally among prostitutes (cf. blow job). This usage probably is not connected to the colloquial imprecation (1781, associated with sailors, e.g. Popeye's "well, blow me down!"), which has past participle blowed. Meaning "to spend (money) foolishly and all at once" is 1890s; that of "bungle an opportunity" is from 1943. To blow over "pass" is from 1610s, originally of storms. To blow (someone's) mind was in use by 1967; there is a song title "Blow Your Mind" released in a 1965 Mirawood recording by a group called The Gas Company.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR BLOW-UP

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.