Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CHAGRIN

"He must have stolen it," muttered Halbert, looking after Robert with disappointment and chagrin.

"She might have been polite enough to invite me in," said Halbert, with chagrin.

I accosted him, when, to my chagrin and disappointment, he was a white man.

Nor was there in this her conclusion anything of chagrin, or pettish self-humiliation.

Yet, despite his chagrin, he realized that he could not send her from him forthwith.

But he must conceal his chagrin, and assume the smile of gayety.

The chagrin of his rival was to pay for all the inconvenience which he incurred himself.

To my chagrin, the duke laid his hand on the window and closed it.

They did obey, but it was with a sorrow and chagrin they could not hide.

The thought that she had committed an error filled her with chagrin.

WORD ORIGIN

1650s, "melancholy," from French chagrin "melancholy, anxiety, vexation" (14c.), from Old North French chagreiner or Angevin dialect chagraigner "sadden," of unknown origin, perhaps [Gamillscheg] from Old French graignier "grieve over, be angry," from graigne "sadness, resentment, grief, vexation," from graim "sorrowful," of unknown origin, perhaps from a Germanic source (cf. Old High German gram "angry, fierce"). But OED and other sources trace it to an identical Old French word, borrowed into English phonetically as shagreen, meaning "rough skin or hide," of uncertain origin, the connecting notion being "roughness, harshness." Modern sense of "feeling of irritation from disappointment" is 1716.

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.