Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR OUTRAGE

As Lizzie put it, Sarah's appearance was an outrage on her contemporaries.

Burke was fairly gasping over this outrage against his authority.

Take them off instantly, and tell me what you mean by this outrage.

The outrage on the Warden was not so grotesque, but the effect was the same.

"It would have been an outrage, sir, if he had won it," broke in a stranger.

The inference is that he was imported from abroad for the purpose of committing this outrage.

But Walter's expression was that of a person upon whom an outrage has just been perpetrated.

But he had gone from extravagance to extravagance, from outrage to outrage.

He lacked words to express his sense of so gross an outrage.

There was another boom in recruiting just then, following on another German outrage.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "evil deed, offense, crime; affront, indignity," from Old French outrage "harm, damage; insult; criminal behavior; presumption, insolence, overweening" (12c.), earlier oltrage (11c.), from Vulgar Latin *ultraticum "excess," from Latin ultra "beyond" (see ultra-). Etymologically, "the passing beyond reasonable bounds" in any sense; meaning narrowed in English toward violent excesses because of folk etymology from out + rage. Of injuries to feelings, principles, etc., from 1769.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR OUTRAGE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.