Synonyms for lick

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Antonyms for lick

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LICK

He knew Jim couldn't swim a lick, so he thought he'd have Jim go drown.

So Uncle Peter had to lick her father and two brothers before he could get her away.

I had been used to see the men about me lick the dust at my feet, for it was gold dust.

Then he burst out, "I'd lick both of you, if I was sure this was a where or when to foight!"

The younger leader turned his head to lick a wound on his shoulder.

Nor, until well out of sight, did he stop to lick his bleeding wounds.

I feel certain that two of us could face this thing and lick it.

It became so stifling that Augustine ran out of spit and was forced to lick her lips.

The whitest meat is not the most juicy, having been made so by frequent bleeding, and giving the calf some whiting to lick.

I wouldn't have had him lick you for five, no, not for ten dollars!

WORD ORIGIN

Old English liccian "to pass the tongue over the surface, lap, lick up," from Proto-Germanic *likkon (cf. Old Saxon likkon, Dutch likken, Old High German lecchon, German lecken, Gothic bi-laigon), from PIE imitative base *leigh- (cf. Sanskrit ledhi "he licks," Armenian lizum "I lick," Greek leikhein "to lick," Latin lingere "to lick," Old Irish ligim "I lick," Welsh llwy "spoon"). French lécher is a Germanic loan word.

To lick (someone or something) into shape (1610s) is in reference to the supposed ways of bears:

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LICK

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.