Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TRACE

Only in one respect does he show any trace of advancing years.

There was no trace of the body in the waters, no drop of blood on the rocks.

He had not been to the bank for two days before, and no trace of him was to be found.

From some other of the author's letters we are able to trace the gradual growth of the work.

The secretary's voice was mechanical, without any trace of feeling.

Then, as a new thought came to the magnate, he spoke with a trace of anxiety.

Yet there was a set of the mouth and a prominence of the chin which relieved him of any trace of effeminacy.

Aggie showed no trace of emotion as her glance ran over the weapon.

The youth vanishes; no reader can find a trace of him, or even an allusion to him.

Her face was ghastly, save for the trace of rouge; her eyes were red-rimmed.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "to make a plan or diagram," from Old French trasser "delineate, score, trace, follow, pursue" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *tractiare "delineate, score, trace" (cf. Spanish trazar "to trace, devise, plan out," Italian tracciare "to follow by foot"), from Latin tractus "track, course," literally "a drawing out," from past participle stem of trahere "to pull, draw" (see tract (n.1)).

Meaning "to pass over" (a path, etc.) is attested from late 14c.; that of "track down, follow the trail of" is early 15c., from trace (n.1). Sense of "draw an outline of" is first recorded late 14c. Meaning "copy a drawing on a transparent sheet laid over it" is recorded from 1762. Related: Traced; tracing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR TRACE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.