Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FOSSIL

No, not a vestage of the fossil is there, not a skull, not a shinbone.

If he turns his attention to fossil animals, he is a palaeontologist.

It was no more fossil than I am; but they call it fossil when it is dug up.

Instead of which the fossil was what he always had been—just one too many.

Their base is Copal, a fossil, resinous substance of vegetable origin.

Fossil—Fossell: this is a fossil, you see, and I'm called Fossell: and so he sends it to me.

But on the whole it is astonishing how little we know of fossil whales.

Even their half-digested remains have been preserved in fossil.

How his Companies could go on putting up with such a fossil for chairman was a marvel!

There is no time when a fossil looks so well as when first exposed.

WORD ORIGIN

1610s, "any thing dug up;" 1650s (adj.) "obtained by digging," from French fossile (16c.), from Latin fossilis "dug up," from fossus, past participle of fodere "to dig," from PIE root *bhedh- "to dig, pierce."

Restricted noun sense of "geological remains of a plant or animal" is from 1736; slang meaning "old person" first recorded 1859. Fossil fuel (1835) preserves the earlier, broader sense.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FOSSIL

ancient

adjectiveold, often very old

golden oldie

nounpopular old song or item
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.