Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SHOW

I saw 'em fur years, with a big cuttin' out to show the cross-section.

"When we are in Athens, I will show you something more beautiful than these," said Pericles.

I can show you people all right that won't ask to see your union card.

I can show it to you, if you desire it, in my father's handwriting.

The horses have not had any water for two days, and show signs of distress.

You ask me how I would have you show your thankfulness for what I have accomplished for you.

The proprietors of the show may be dukes, and earls, and marquisses, and so forth.

If there were people in the building they did not choose to show a light.

Only in one respect does he show any trace of advancing years.

He then proceeded to show the inadequacy of the figures presented by Mr. O'Connell.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sceawian "to look at, see, gaze, behold, observe; inspect, examine; look for, choose," from West Germanic *skauwojan (cf. Old Saxon skauwon "to look at," Old Frisian skawia, Dutch schouwen, Old High German scouwon "to look at;" Dutch schoon, Gothic skaunjai "beautiful," originally "conspicuous"), from Proto-Germanic root *skau- "behold, look at," from PIE *skou-, variant of root *skeue- "to pay attention, perceive" (see caveat).

Causal meaning "let be seen; put in sight, make known" evolved c.1200 for unknown reasons and is unique to English (German schauen still means "look at"). Spelling shew, popular 18c. and surviving into early 19c., represents obsolete pronunciation (rhymes with view). Horse racing sense is from 1903, perhaps from an earlier sense in card-playing.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SHOW

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.