vaudeville

[ vawd-vil, vohd-, vaw-duh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF vaudeville

Synonyms for vaudeville

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR VAUDEVILLE

His brother was director of the Vaudeville in partnership with Raymond Deslandes.

The Vaudeville, when it was opened, was devoted to all that was light and cheerful.

Tristan's vaudeville scheme was not as easily realized as said.

But on thinking it over, he decided like the vaudeville man.

I have seen the Arabs at the Vaudeville; they have magnificent beards.'

At twenty-one he left me and married a woman from the vaudeville stage.

They called Eric from private life to be headliner in their vaudeville.

I put in most of the day watchin' 'em at it, and it was as good as a vaudeville act.

"It's good enough for the vaudeville stage just as it is," he declared.

I have but recently returned from the vaudeville of the centuries.

WORD ORIGIN

1739, "light, popular song," especially one sung on the stage, from French vaudeville, alteration (by influence of ville "town") of Middle French vaudevire, said to be from (chanson du) Vau de Vire "(song of the) valley of Vire," in the Calvados region of Normandy, first applied to the popular satirical songs of Olivier Basselin, a 15c. poet who lived in Vire.

The alternative explanation is that vaudevire derives from Middle French dialectal vauder "to go" + virer "to turn." The meaning "theatrical entertainment interspersed with songs" first recorded 1827.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR VAUDEVILLE

burlesque

nounbawdy show; vaudeville
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.