theater

[ thee-uh-ter, theeuh- ]SEE DEFINITION OF theater
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR THEATER

He also went to the theater, although he thought it unworthy of a Roman to be an actor.

You never go to the theater on Sunday in England—you are all pietistisch.

With which he turned into the theater, and I followed thoughtfully.

I had never been in a theater in my life, and the name was but a name to me.

I am glad you will get to see one, as the theater closes after to-night.

The theater season closed with that evening on which “Lohengrin” was performed.

They seemed to have only parted at the doors of the theater the day before.

There seemed nothing better to do, during the evening, than to go to the theater.

She is my stenographer, and most certainly not the woman who was in the theater to-night.

She seemed glad of his assistance, and, leaning on his arm, made her way from the theater.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "open air place in ancient times for viewing spectacles," from Old French theatre (12c.), from Latin theatrum, from Greek theatron "theater," literally "place for viewing," from theasthai "to behold" (cf. thea "a view," theates "spectator") + -tron, suffix denoting place. Meaning "building where plays are shown" (1570s) was transferred to that of "plays, writing, production, the stage" (1660s). Spelling with -re prevailed in Britain after c.1700, but American English retained or revived the older spelling in -er. Generic sense of "place of action" is from 1580s; especially "region where war is being fought" (1914).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR THEATER

classroom

nounroom where learning takes place
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.