Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ROOM

Uncle Peter stood in a flood of light at the door of his room.

He began to pace the floor again from one room to the other.

"It is eighteen years since I was last in this room," he said.

There was no bell in the room, so that was the only way I had of doing it.

Mauburn had gone to his room to be alone with this bitter news.

Jumping over the window sill, the visitor found himself in this room.

"You can sleep there," he said, pointing to a cot bed in the corner of the room.

The music flooded the hall and the room, so that the talk died low.

The room we entered was heated by what I took to be a successful furnace.

At night when the room grows dark we push a button and there is light.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English rum "space" (extent or time); "scope, opportunity," from Proto-Germanic *ruman (cf. Old Norse, Old Saxon, Old High German, Gothic rum, German Raum "space," Dutch ruim "hold of a ship, nave"), nouns formed from Germanic adjective *ruma- "roomy, spacious," from PIE root *reue- "to open; space" (cf. Avestan ravah- "space," Latin rus "open country," Old Irish roi, roe "plain field," Old Church Slavonic ravinu "level," Russian raviina "a plain," Polish rum "space"). Old English also had a frequent adjective rum "roomy, wide, long, spacious."

Original sense preserved in make room "clear space for oneself" (late 14c.); meaning "chamber, cabin" first recorded early 14c. as a nautical term, and first applied mid-15c. to chambers within houses. The Old English word for this was cofa, ancestor of cove. Room-service is attested from 1913; room-temperature from 1879. Roomth "sufficient space" (1530s) now is obsolete.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ROOM

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.