Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MINSTREL

"I trust that I am a better bowman than a minstrel," said he.

The harp of the minstrel is untruly touched, if his own glory is all that it records.

The minstrel, like the fighters, revels in hard knocks and rough jests.

She seemed the minstrel of her race mourning for a vanished world.

Cappen Varra, minstrel of Croy, clung to the bench and sighed.

Where is our once charming acrobat—our minstrel of muscular music?

But the minstrel had another name, wonderful as the one I have already told to you.

All festal occasions in Circassian life are enlivened by the presence of the minstrel.

But I have been worried ever since that minstrel crowd has been gathering at the tan-yard.

When the minstrel troupe arrived, hundreds were at the depot.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., from Old French menestrel "entertainer, poet, musician; servant, workman; good-for-nothing, rogue," from Medieval Latin ministralis "servant, jester, singer," from Late Latin ministerialem (nominative ministerialis) "imperial household officer, one having an official duty," from ministerialis (adj.) "ministerial," from Latin ministerium (see ministry). The connecting notion is via the jester, etc., as a court position.

Specific sense of "musician" developed in Old French, but in English until 16c. the word was used of anyone (singers, storytellers, jugglers, buffoons) whose profession was to entertain patrons. Only in 18c. was the word limited, in a historical sense, to "medieval singer of heroic or lyric poetry who accompanied himself on a stringed instrument." Reference to blackface music acts in U.S. is from 1843.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MINSTREL

bard

nountroubadour
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.