magnificence

[ mag-nif-uh-suhns ]SEE DEFINITION OF magnificence
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MAGNIFICENCE

A queen in the magnificence of her courtly surroundings could not have conquered him so quickly.

In all their magnificence they stalked abroad, lords of the veldt.

But the visions of Mrs Verloc lacked nobility and magnificence.

Connal enjoyed Ormond's surprise at the magnificence of his hotel.

There may be magnificence in the smashing; but the thing is smashed.

Your house, table, equipages, may be all in the highest style of magnificence.

Her senses were bewildered in the contemplation of so much grandeur and magnificence.

I have fled from myself; I have fled from the magnificence of my retinue, to find variety.

The pomp and magnificence of sunset were in abeyance to-night, were laid aside.

On the Rigi his musings on the magnificence of the view are checked by the presence of a cretin.

WORD ORIGIN

mid-14c., "great-mindedness, courage," from Old French magnificence "splendor, nobility, grandeur," from Latin magnificentia "splendor, munificence," from stem of magnificus "great, elevated, noble, eminent," also "splendid, rich, fine, costly," literally "doing great deeds," from magnus "great" (see magnate) + root of facere "to make" (see factitious). Meaning "greatness, grandeur, glory" in English is from late 14c. That of "beauty, splendor, wealth" is 15c. As one of the Aristotelian and scholastic virtues, it translates Greek megaloprepeia "liberality of expenditure combined with good taste."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MAGNIFICENCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.