Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SIGHT

She had left these two boys, unwelcome appendages in his sight.

She'd marry me—she'd marry you, if you was the best thing in sight.

It would be pleasanter inland, but we must be near the shore, so as to be in sight of ships.

There was no one in sight, but it was evident that a party from an American ship had visited the island.

They stopped short in surprise at the sight of Robert and Bates.

To the North, South, and East nothing but spinifex sand-hills in sight.

As for my brother, he seemed enchanted with the sight, and especially with the ladies.

From the camp only plains were in sight, not a tree visible.

I can see the dominoes with my fingers—touch is just as good as sight.

As the boat floated on, every sight and sound appeared strange.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sihð, gesiht, gesihð "thing seen; faculty of sight; aspect; vision; apparition," from Proto-Germanic *sekh(w)- (cf. Danish sigte, Swedish sigt, Middle Dutch sicht, Dutch zicht, Old High German siht, German Sicht, Gesicht), stem that also yielded Old English seon (see see (v.)), with noun suffix -th (2), later -t.

Meaning "perception or apprehension by means of the eyes" is from early 13c. Meaning "device on a firearm to assist in aiming" is from 1580s. A "show" of something, hence, colloquially, "a great many; a lot" (late 14c.). Sight for sore eyes "welcome visitor" is attested from 1738; sight unseen "without previous inspection" is from 1892. Sight gag first attested 1944. Middle English had sighty (late 14c.) "visible, conspicuous; bright, shining; attractive, handsome;" c.1400 as "keen-sighted;" mid-15c. as "discerning" (cf. German sichtig "visible").

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SIGHT

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.