Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR WEIGH

When John Porter left the stand, the horses had just cantered back to weigh in.

Here's the cloth an' some leads; weigh out a hundred and twelve too.

His steel-yards wuz broke, so he had to weigh 'em in the house.

Weigh them, and allow to each pound of oranges a pound of loaf-sugar.

Weigh them, and to each pound of apples allow a pound of loaf-sugar.

Then weigh three quarters of a pound, and grate it into a dish.

Weigh them, and to every pound of cucumbers allow a pound of loaf-sugar.

Cut up and wash a cocoa-nut, and grate as much of it as will weigh a pound.

Mary looked up at him with that abstracted gaze with which we weigh and judge.

He was too wise to weigh carefully his reasons for looking at the best side of events.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English wegan "find the weight of, have weight, lift, carry," from Proto-Germanic *weganan (cf. Old Saxon wegan, Old Frisian wega, Dutch wegen "to weigh," Old Norse vega, Old High German wegan "to move, carry, weigh," German wiegen "to weigh"), from PIE *wegh- "to move" (cf. Sanskrit vahati "carries, conveys," vahitram "vessel, ship;" Avestan vazaiti "he leads, draws;" Greek okhos "carriage;" Latin vehere "to carry, convey;" Old Church Slavonic vesti "to carry, convey;" Lithuanian vezu "to carry, convey;" Old Irish fecht "campaign, journey").

The original sense was of motion, which led to that of lifting, then to that of "measure the weight of." The older sense of "lift, carry" survives in the nautical phrase weigh anchor. Figurative sense of "to consider, ponder" (in reference to words, etc.) is recorded from mid-14c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR WEIGH

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.