Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SCALE

To prepare it in this way, secure a perch and scale and clean it.

That mountain wall, impracticable as it seems, we have to scale.

Throughout he must remember, how small is the scale of operations.

Weighed in this scale, what a profanation is this man guilty of!

It was not fitted out upon the scale which Nelson had proposed.

It seems that—shooting—was the last little weight that tilted the scale against me.

That is probably the mildest degree in the scale of unpleasantness.

Well, then, the scale of good wifeship I divide into ten parts.

"Too risky to scale that," Frank mused, as he noted the sharp-pointed palings.

Remained only the probability of our being able, encumbered by a pack, to scale the mountains.

WORD ORIGIN

"skin plates on fish or snakes," c.1300, from Old French escale "cup, scale, shell pod, husk" (12c., Modern French écale) "scale, husk," from Frankish *skala or some other Germanic source, from Proto-Germanic *skælo "split, divide" (cf. Dutch schaal "a scale, husk," Old High German scala "shell," Gothic skalja "tile," Old English scealu "shell, husk"), from PIE root *(s)kel- (1) "to cut, cleave, split" (cf. Latin culter "knife," scalpere "to cut, scrape;" Old Church Slavonic skolika "mussel, shell," Russian skala "rind, bark," Lithuanian skelti "split," Old English scell "shell," scalu "drinking cup, bowl, scale of a balance").

In reference to humans, as a condition of certain skin diseases, it is attested from c.1400. As what falls from one's eye when blindness ends (usually figurative), it echoes Acts ix:18 (Latin tanquam squamæ, Greek hosei lepides).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SCALE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.