Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DEGREE

Aunt Jane approached a degree nearer the equator, and said, gently, "I fear I do."

It came, to some degree, with the realisation that the Universal Thought must be with me.

To a degree that convinces myself I have made the demonstration.

I am speaking for the moment only of the degree to which the testing comes.

The degree to which we work them out depends on our own efforts.

If you think they were embarrassed to the degree that they could not eat, you are mistaken.

At last, however, he mastered his irritation to some degree, and spoke his command briefly.

But he was, to some degree, apathetic from over-much misery.

The Street came decorously, albeit with a degree of uncertainty as to supper.

The degree he refused to accept, for what reason has never been explained.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., from Old French degré (12c.) "a step (of a stair), pace, degree (of relationship), academic degree; rank, status, position," said to be from Vulgar Latin *degradus "a step," from Late Latin degredare, from Latin de- "down" (see de-) + gradus "step" (see grade (n.)).

Most modern senses date from Middle English, from notion of a hierarchy of steps. Meaning "a grade of crime" is 1670s; that of "a unit of temperature" is from 1727. The division of the circle into 360 degrees was known in Babylon and Egypt. It is perhaps from the daily motion of the sun through the zodiac in the course of a year.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DEGREE

academic degree

nouncollege degree
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.