Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR TEACHES

"I mean the philosopher, who teaches in the groves of Academus," continued he.

It teaches as a fact that which is not true; and it claims as right that which God has not given.

Example is one of the most potent of instructors, though it teaches without a tongue.

Is this the way that he teaches the officers of his Majesty's guard to use their weapons?'

This is the importunity He teaches, and we must learn: to claim and take the blessing.

The prudence which teaches one man to be a Whig, will make of another a Utopian.

He teaches us to go to and fro willingly, gladly, from the highest to the lowest.

One thing he teaches, that there is rottenness where he appears.

I mean to say—Does he who teaches anything persuade men of that which he teaches or not?

Then, is it not our mother, rather than our father, who teaches us to speak when we are children?

WORD ORIGIN

Old English tæcan (past tense and past participle tæhte) "to show, point out," also "to give instruction," from Proto-Germanic *taikijanan (cf. Old High German zihan, German zeihen "to accuse," Gothic ga-teihan "to announce"), from PIE *deik- "to show, point out" (see diction). Related to Old English tacen, tacn "sign, mark" (see token). Related: Taught; teaching.

Old English tæcan had more usually a sense of "show, declare, warn, persuade" (cf. German zeigen "to show," from the same root); while the Old English word for "to teach, instruct, guide" was more commonly læran, source of modern learn and lore.