Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR DOWN

Miss Avice won't be down, sir, and I'm to fetch her up a pot of coffee, sir.

Blowing out the candle, he advanced to the table and set it down.

I was down at the river just now, and saw it with my own eyes.

Charmed, old man; deuced pally of you to stay by us down in that hole, you know.

I need the out-doors, and anyway you don't need me down there.

I knew those fellows inside were bound to hammer it down if they could.

And he was both to batter it down, for he still had the gambler's faith in his luck.

Her mind is set on taking it down, yet she will not peril her husband.

Hannah, as she moves up and down, is shunned as a person infected.

It was proposed to send for me down: but my father said, he could not bear to look upon me.

WORD ORIGIN

late Old English shortened form of Old English ofdune "downwards," from dune "from the hill," dative of dun "hill" (see down (n.2)). A sense development peculiar to English.

Used as a preposition since c.1500. Sense of "depressed mentally" is attested from c.1600. Slang sense of "aware, wide awake" is attested from 1812. Computer crash sense is from 1965. As a preposition from late 14c.; as an adjective from 1560s. Down-and-out is from 1889, American English, from situation of a beaten prizefighter. Down home (adj.) is 1931, American English; down the hatch as a toast is from 1931; down to the wire is 1901, from horse-racing. Down time is from 1952. Down under "Australia and New Zealand" attested from 1886; Down East "Maine" is from 1825.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR DOWN

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.