precipitating

[ verb pri-sip-i-teyt; adjective, noun pri-sip-i-tit, -teyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF precipitating
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRECIPITATING

The respective land forces were ever on the point of precipitating the end.

Her husband had arrived in Washington unexpectedly, precipitating the crisis.

The solutions of iron are a constant trouble by precipitating.

"No," said Lady Rookwood, precipitating herself into the marble coffin.

Precipitating a weak solution of ammonio-sulphate of copper green.

By precipitating a soluble salt of nickel with caustic potassa.

Well, wait then, there is no reason for precipitating things.

In many respects it resembles benzoic acid, from which, however it is distinguished by not precipitating the salts of iron.

The progress of events in France was precipitating the crisis.

In a speech to a Charleston crowd he besought them, as a way of precipitating Virginia into the lists, to strike blow.

WORD ORIGIN

"to hurl or fling down," 1520s, a back formation from precipitation or else from Latin praecipitatus, past participle of praecipitare "to throw or dive headlong," from praeceps "steep, headlong, headfirst" (see precipice). Meaning "to cause to happen, hurry the beginning of" is recorded from 1620s. Chemical sense is from 1620s; meteorological sense first attested 1863. Related: Precipitated; precipitating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRECIPITATING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.