Synonyms for sinking

MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SINKING

I will cause the axe in the act of sinking to do away his sin.

"I was in a hurry to get back to camp," grinned Chip, sinking into a chair.

Sinking my voice to a whisper, I said: "Tell me what you have seen in my eyes, Rima?"

From the outer edges of this mass men were sinking to the ground.

When there is a Point behind the sinking Mark, it denotes, that the Heel must be bent downwards.

She was just sinking to sleep, when she thought she heard the faint sound of a bell.

When there is a Point at the end of the sinking Mark, it shews, that the Toe must be bent downwards.

Oh, precious words, sinking right into the torn, troubled heart.

"Don't you say it, if you do think it," said her aunt, sinking into a chair and rocking vigorously.

Then, sinking before him in a deep courtesy, "I am beholden to you," she said.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English sincan (intransitive) "become submerged, go under, subside" (past tense sanc, past participle suncen), from Proto-Germanic *senkwanan (cf. Old Saxon sinkan, Old Norse sökkva, Middle Dutch sinken, Dutch zinken, Old High German sinkan, German sinken, Gothic sigqan), from PIE root *sengw- "to sink."

The transitive use (mid-13c.) supplanted Middle English sench (cf. drink/drench) which died out 14c. Related: Sank; sunk; sinking. Sinking fund is from 1724. Adjective phrase sink or swim is from 1660s. To sink without a trace is World War I military jargon, translating German spurlos versenkt.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SINKING

concave

adjectivecurved, depressed
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.