Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SLIDING

A soft, sliding hillock of sand lay directly in front of them.

Wally and Jack were sliding their chairs back from the table preparing to follow him.

I have been sliding off and clambering on ever since I bade goodbye to Havant.

White Fang, sliding by in quest of meat, stopped and began to eat the chips.

These were penetrated with sliding shutters, which stood open.

Its nose was to the trail, and it trotted with a peculiar, sliding, effortless gait.

Royalties were to be paid on a sliding scale, and, from the very first, they were large.

The German was sliding down the bank into the water as he spoke.

The cut should be made with a sliding movement of the knife.

"Just a minute," he added, striving to keep his voice from sliding the scale.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English slidan (intransitive, past tense slad, past participle sliden) "to glide, slip, fall, fall down;" figuratively "fail, lapse morally, err; be transitory or unstable," from Proto-Germanic *slidan "to slip, slide" (cf. Old High German slito, German Schlitten "sleigh, sled"), from PIE root *sleidh- "to slide, slip" (cf. Lithuanian slystu "to glide, slide," Old Church Slavonic sledu "track," Greek olisthos "slipperiness," olisthanein "to slip," Middle Irish sloet "slide").

Meaning "slip, lose one's footing" is from early 13c. Transitive sense from 1530s. Phrase let (something) slide "let it take its own course" is in Chaucer (late 14c.). Sliding scale in reference to payments, etc., is from 1842.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SLIDING

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.