Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MELANCHOLY

She pitied herself,—that lowest ebb of melancholy self-consciousness.

If he be proved culpable in this most melancholy business, and, alas!

"Trouble him not," murmured the melancholy man, with gentleness.

And that was to Andrew the most melancholy sound in the world.

If the boys had not appeared we might now be weeping in a melancholy row.

To these questions a mental echo answered with a melancholy negative.

"Yes," he said; and looked at Stineli with a most melancholy expression.

In such a diversity it was impossible I should be disposed to melancholy.

He was leaning towards Jane, regarding her with melancholy tenderness.

Vivian felt every moment his disgust and his melancholy increase.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "condition characterized by sullenness, gloom, irritability," from Old French melancolie "black bile, ill disposition, anger, annoyance" (13c.), from Late Latin melancholia, from Greek melankholia "sadness," literally (excess of) "black bile," from melas (genitive melanos) "black" (see melanin) + khole "bile" (see Chloe). Medieval physiology attributed depression to excess of "black bile," a secretion of the spleen and one of the body's four "humors."

The Latin word also is the source of Spanish melancolia, Italian melancolia, German Melancholie, Danish melankoli, etc. Old French variant malencolie (also in Middle English) is by false association with mal "sickness."

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MELANCHOLY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.