lachrymose

[ lak-ruh-mohs ]SEE DEFINITION OF lachrymose

Synonyms for lachrymose

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LACHRYMOSE

But women must beware of sham emotion and lachrymose sentimentality.

The gills are notched, rather distant, pallid, then cinnamon; lachrymose.

Then it had cried out once, and so remained ever lachrymose and in agony.

His tone had never been so lachrymose, nor his face so full of woe.

The too lachrymose Madonna in terra-cotta, 256, already ushers in the decadence.

For Servius, who is timid and lachrymose, everything has gone astray.

Besides, the expression of her face was lachrymose in the extreme.

"You're too late," stated his countryman in lachrymose tones.

She had, I fancy, expected to find her in a lachrymose state.

He is the only one who has attempted the lachrymose, the sentimental novel.

WORD ORIGIN

1660s, "tear-like," from Latin lacrimosus "tearful, sorrowful, weeping," also "causing tears, lamentable," from lacrima "tear," a dialect-altered borrowing of Greek dakryma "tear," from dakryein "to shed tears," from dakry "tear," from PIE *dakru-/*draku- (see tear (n.)). Meaning "given to tears, tearful" is first attested 1727; meaning "of a mournful character" is from 1822. The -d- to -l- alteration in Latin is the so-called "Sabine -L-," cf. Latin olere "smell," from root of odor, and Ulixes, the Latin form of Greek Odysseus. The Medieval Latin practice of writing -ch- for -c- before Latin -r- also altered anchor, pulchritude, sepulchre. The -y- is pedantic, from belief in a Greek origin. Middle English had lacrymable "tearful" (mid-15c.).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LACHRYMOSE

maudlin

adjectiveteary, overemotional
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.