Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR BLEAKER

The rain had ceased; but the night was dark, and the wind was bleaker than ever.

Greg's face was bleaker than usual as he turned from the board to look at Russ.

The bleaker the situation, so it is near a stream border, the better the cassiope loves it.

They reached Waterville an hour later, and they found it even smaller and bleaker than they expected.

It is like a fire that flares up brilliantly for a while and then leaves everything blacker and bleaker than before.

We forded it without accident, and, crossing a loftier and bleaker range, came down into the valley of the Marchan.

He went to Guernsey, a neighbouring island, bleaker and less temperate in climate.

Hadria suffered from a gnawing home-sickness; a longing for the rougher, bleaker scenery of the North.

The soldier may have the sunny side of the wall in peace, but assuredly he has the bleaker side in times of war.

I intended to remain until June, but the spring there is bleaker than your own New England.

WORD ORIGIN

c.1300, "pale," from Old Norse bleikr "pale, whitish, blond," from Proto-Germanic *blaika- "shining, white," from PIE root *bhel- (1) "to shine, flash, burn" (see bleach (v.)). Later "bare, windswept" (1530s). Sense of "cheerless" is c.1719 figurative extension. The same Germanic root produced Old English blac "pale," but this died out, probably from confusion with blæc "black;" however bleak persisted, with a sense of "bare" as well as "pale."