melancholic

[ mel-uh n-kol-ik ]SEE DEFINITION OF melancholic
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MELANCHOLIC

The captain was a clever, melancholic man, who had no unusual grip on his crew.

This is the melancholic temperament, which does not shrink from the most profound inquiry.

My dear Madam, I am really getting too serious, philosophic, and melancholic.

She watched Paul growing irritable, priggish, and melancholic.

But he fretted so, got so furious suddenly, and again was melancholic.

If my temper be melancholic, melancholy has a happiness of its own.

He was one of the most complete specimens of the melancholic temperament.

The rest of it is arid, rugged, and of a melancholic aspect.

This turned in his later years into a melancholic temperament.

One person could be at once bilious, melancholic and lymphatic.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from melancholy + -ic, or else from Late Latin melancholicus, from Greek melankholikos "choleric," from melankholia "sadness" (see melancholy). As a noun, from 1580s. Earlier adjective formation was melancholian (mid-14c.), and melancholiac (mid-19c.) also was tried.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MELANCHOLIC

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.