Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR APPEALS

Timon gives with both hands, but when he appeals to his friends, is treated as a bore.

He appeals to the temper of wonder, and creates that mood in which alone he can be understood.

He appeals, 'Good lord, father, you are not going to begin now.'

He's a man who appeals to me, and I want to help his suit and give him Lucile, if I can.

Appeals to a sense of duty do not reach beyond the understanding.

So far, he appeals only to a very select section of the public.

But has the rumseller been confounded or speechless at these appeals?

This was exactly the sort of "tit-for-tat" humor that appeals to a Yankee crowd.

He allows of two appeals—in each case however with an increase of the penalty.

He saw her sinking lower than ever man sinks; he heard her appeals, her supplications.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., originally in legal sense of "to call" to a higher judge or court, from Anglo-French apeler "to call upon, accuse," Old French apeler "make an appeal" (11c., Modern French appeler), from Latin appellare "to accost, address, appeal to, summon, name," iterative of appellere "to prepare," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + pellere "to beat, drive" (see pulse (n.1)). Related: Appealed; appealing.

Probably a Roman metaphoric extension of a nautical term for "driving a ship toward a particular landing." Popular modern meaning "to be attractive or pleasing" is quite recent, attested from 1907 (appealing in this sense is from 1891), from the notion of "to address oneself in expectation of a sympathetic response."

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.