Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PRESAGE

For a moment there was a pause, as if at a presage of disaster.

Fatal words they were,—the presage of the mishap they threatened!

In the early spring of 1784 Diderot had an attack which he knew to be the presage of the end.

But the softness in the Christmas air did not presage a thaw.

Thus she left him without so much as a backward glance to presage future favour.

Then for a long while she could not sleep at night and was haunted by a presage of disaster.

Transient thought of that which shall be, presage of better rest?

Such conspiracies were the presage of what was soon to happen in Germany.

It must have some presage of the result before it will turn its energies to its attainment.

Then, in sooth, by the rule of contraries, a fall should presage humility's reward.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "something that portends," from Latin praesagium "a foreboding," from praesagire "to perceive beforehand, forebode," from praesagus (adj.) "perceiving beforehand, prophetic," from prae "before" (see pre-) + sagus "prophetic," related to sagire "perceive" (see sagacious).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR PRESAGE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.