Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR STAR

In the beginning, a star, when drawn with a nail into a brick looked as follows.

It is the star that is not reached and the harvest sleeping in the unplowed ground.

Two or three of the star blossoms from the tree had fallen all his head.

But was the "star and crescent" the symbol of the City of Constantine?

Aunt is so funny, not to have guessed who wrote the Star article.

I went out into the warm and rainy night, but there was no Cadge at the Star office.

It was the voice of the Morning Star walking between the hills, and the Turk was happy.

He kept his eyes upon the Star, where it burned white on the horizon.

This is the animal page of the Sunday Star and Cadge is in a hurry for it, to do the obbligato.

She unfolded a Star clipping and proudly spread it upon my knee.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English steorra, from Proto-Germanic *sterron, *sternon (cf. Old Saxon sterro, Old Norse stjarna, Old Frisian stera, Dutch ster, Old High German sterro, German Stern, Gothic stairno), from PIE *ster- (cf. Sanskrit star-, Hittite shittar, Greek aster, astron, Latin stella, Breton sterenn, Welsh seren "star").

Astrological sense of "influence of planets and zodiac on human affairs" is recorded from mid-13c.; star-crossed is from "Romeo and Juliet" (1592). Stars as a ranking of quality for hotels, restaurants, etc. are attested from 1886, originally in Baedecker guides. Brass star as a police badge is recorded from 1859 (New York City).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR STAR

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.