Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR FEATURE

His red slave's wig is thus made a feature in the characterization.

There is one feature of the regulation in question, however, that does pain us.

One feature of the "Monday Evenings" had, in the course of time, to be changed.

There was not the change of a feature in the face of the woman who listened to the accusation.

She had fine eyes and a fine complexion, yet no regularity of feature.

I described Bedr el Gemly as best I could, feature by feature.

A hardy old soldier, I should judge, from his feature and attire.'

Its expression was as visible as my hand in the sun, but no feature.

We therefore trust that this feature in the Magazine will be appreciated.

A feature of the book is the historical parallelism which runs through it.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "make, form, fashion," from Anglo-French feture, from Old French faiture "deed, action; fashion, shape, form; countenance," from Latin factura "a formation, a working," from past participle stem of facere "make, do, perform" (see factitious). Sense of "facial characteristic" is mid-14c.; that of "any distinctive part" first recorded 1690s. Entertainment sense is from 1801; in journalism by 1855. Meaning "a feature film" is from 1913.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR FEATURE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.