circumstance

[ sur-kuhm-stans or, esp. British, -stuhns ]SEE DEFINITION OF circumstance
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR CIRCUMSTANCE

The good woman, although low in circumstance, is great in mind!

He must get the dominion over circumstance, or circumstance must get the dominion over him.

On them it is forced from without, by sheer pressure of circumstance.

This boy had, so she would accept what the gods of time and circumstance provided.

I afterwards fell in with Bradbury, who mentioned this circumstance to me.

Only one other circumstance is mentioned in the history of the Shunammite.

What a lesson of gratitude is taught in every scene and circumstance!

He saw, at a glance, that the circumstance might possibly be improved to further his own ends.

There is still one circumstance, replied I, which you seem to have overlooked.

The curse of circumstance had humbled, but reconciled him to the dust.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "conditions surrounding and accompanying an event," from Old French circonstance "circumstance, situation," also literally, "outskirts" (13c., Modern French circonstance), from Latin circumstantia "surrounding condition," neuter plural of circumstans (genitive circumstantis), present participle of circumstare "stand around, surround, encompass, occupy, take possession of" from circum "around" (see circum-) + stare "to stand" from PIE root *sta- "to stand" (see stet). The Latin word is a loan-translation of Greek peristasis.

Meaning "a person's surroundings, environment" is from mid-14c. Meaning "a detail" is from c.1300; sense of "that which is non-essential" is from 1590s. Obsolete sense of "formality about an important event" (late 14c.) lingers in Shakespeare's phrase pomp and circumstance ("Othello" III, iii).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR CIRCUMSTANCE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.