synonyms
  • definitions

subject

[ noun, adjective suhb-jikt; verb suh b-jekt ]SEE DEFINITION OF subject
  • adj.at the mercy of; answerable
  • nounissue, matter
  • nounone under authority of another

Synonyms for subject

  • accountable
  • apt
  • conditional
  • dependent
  • exposed
  • inferior
  • liable
  • likely
  • prone
  • secondary
  • sensitive
  • susceptible
  • vulnerable
  • captive
  • collateral
  • contingent
  • controlled
  • directed
  • disposed
  • enslaved
  • governed
  • open
  • ruled
  • satellite
  • sub
  • subaltern
  • subjugated
  • subordinate
  • tributary
  • at one's feet
  • bound by
  • in danger of
  • obedient
  • provisional
  • servile
  • slavish
  • submissive
  • subservient
  • substract
  • tentative
  • under
MOST RELEVANT

Antonyms for subject

  • first-class
  • first-rate
  • guarded
  • inapt
  • independent
  • irresponsible
  • protected
  • safe
  • superior
  • unaccountable
  • unlikely
  • unsusceptible
  • certain
  • chief
  • definite
  • free
  • primary
  • sure
  • master
MOST RELEVANT
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SUBJECT

But there is one subject, on which my mind is filled with foreboding.

Mrs. Davis saw that there was no use in pursuing the subject, and it dropped.

He was not timid, however, and resolved to broach the subject.

What he had to say therefore on the subject would not detain them long.

At all events, this was a subject upon which I received no enlightening from their confidant.

Had I been subject only to his examination, my ordeal would not have been severe.

Connected with this subject is the character of the currency.

"Come to me to-morrow, Caleb," continued my friend, changing the subject.

The supremacy of the nation and its laws should be no longer a subject of debate.

He was prepared to talk all night on the subject of Toddles.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., "person under control or dominion of another," from Old French suget, subget "a subject person or thing" (12c.), from Latin subiectus, noun use of past participle of subicere "to place under," from sub "under" (see sub-) + combining form of iacere "to throw" (see jet (v.)). In 14c., sugges, sogetis, subgit, sugette; form re-Latinized in English 16c.

Meaning "person or thing that may be acted upon" is recorded from 1590s. Meaning "subject matter of an art or science" is attested from 1540s, probably short for subject matter (late 14c.), which is from Medieval Latin subjecta materia, a loan translation of Greek hypokeimene hyle (Aristotle), literally "that which lies beneath." Likewise some specific uses in logic and philosophy are borrowed directly from Latin subjectum "foundation or subject of a proposition," a loan-translation of Aristotle's to hypokeimenon. Grammatical sense is recorded from 1630s. The adjective is attested from early 14c.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SUBJECT

affair

nounmatter or business to be taken care of; happening activity

amenable

adjectiveable to be judged; responsible

answerable

adjectiveresponsible
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.
  • PREVIOUS
  • NEXT