Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR KINDS

When milk is used in a meal, what kinds of food may be omitted?

Here, as elsewhere throughout France, all kinds of land tenure are found.

I know the beech and the maple, and some kinds of oak, but there my wood lore ends.

There are in my experience but four kinds of waiters the world over.

All kinds o' games had been put up on him and he beat 'em all.

They had got themselves up in all kinds of costumes, for this "act."

There are two kinds of camels—the camel proper and the camel improper.

Calamities are of two kinds: misfortune to ourselves, and good fortune to others.

There are several other kinds of crosses besides those in churchyards.

His work in other kinds is of a very different order of excellence.

WORD ORIGIN

"class, sort, variety," from Old English gecynd "kind, nature, race," related to cynn "family" (see kin), from Proto-Germanic *gakundjaz "family, race" (see kind (adj.)). Ælfric's rendition of "the Book of Genesis" into Old English came out gecyndboc. The prefix disappeared 1150-1250. No exact cognates beyond English, but it corresponds to adjective endings such as Goth -kunds, Old High German -kund. Also in English as a suffix (mankind, etc.). Other earlier, now obsolete, senses in English included "character, quality derived from birth" and "manner or way natural or proper to anyone." Use in phrase a kind of (1590s) led to colloquial extension as adverb (1804) in phrases such as kind of stupid ("a kind of stupid (person)").

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.