assimilate

[ verb uh-sim-uh-leyt; noun uh-sim-uh-lit, -leyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF assimilate
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ASSIMILATE

He gives what His hearers might be assumed to be able to assimilate; but that is all.

What sense would there be in attempting to assimilate our several needs?

He thought for himself, and yet he could assimilate the ideas of other men.

Again there was an electric silence, and Beardsley let it assimilate.

There was more to be got if we had the wit to assimilate it.

Only to be is motion to convert or assimilate something else.

"That is quite a load to assimilate all at once," Hilton agreed.

We have been able to assimilate foreign elements with great rapidity.

Democracy has on one side to assimilate aristocracy, and not overturn it.

This is the reason why it is not allowable to assimilate labor to war as they do.

WORD ORIGIN

early 15c., from Latin assimilatus "feigned, pretended, fictitious," past participle of assimilare "to make like," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + simulare "make similar," from similis "like, resembling" (see similar). Originally transitive (with to); intransitive use first recorded 1837. Related: Assimilated; assimilating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ASSIMILATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.