Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ANTICIPATE

She was distrustful of the future, and apt to anticipate bad fortune.

This junction O'Neill was determined to defeat, and did defeat it;—but let us not anticipate.

But I do not anticipate that we shall ever have much malgamite on our hands.

But we need not anticipate evil: that is to send out for the suffering.

Not to anticipate events, however, we will now return to the party in the launch.

But this was just what the Alpini and Bersaglieri had been trained to anticipate.

Moreover it was impossible to anticipate the direction of his shots.

It pleased her much to anticipate an end to a risky situation.

I anticipate no difficulty, though it requires some thought in manipulation.

You do not, I hope, anticipate anything of the sort in this case.

WORD ORIGIN

1530s, "to cause to happen sooner," a back-formation from anticipation, or else from Latin anticipatus, past participle of anticipare "take (care of) ahead of time," literally "taking into possession beforehand," from ante "before" (see ante) + capere "to take" (see capable).

Later "to be aware of (something) coming at a future time" (1640s). Used in the sense of "expect, look forward to" since 1749, but anticipate has an element of "prepare for, forestall" that should prevent its being used as a synonym for expect. Related: Anticipated; anticipating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ANTICIPATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.