Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AFFECTION

I know, better than you possibly can, what reasons I have to trust the strength of his affection.

"He is a good son to me," said Mrs. Rushton, with a glance of affection.

Though passion may have strained it must not break our bonds of affection.

She had no affection for this selfish invalid, this weak, peevish bully.

Her affection concentrated on two objects, the house and Maggie, Maggie and the house.

He drew off: and then ran into the highest professions of reverence and affection for you.

It is not easy for an Anglo-Saxon to confess the realities of affection in vital intimacies.

But a sudden unaccustomed gust of affection swirled in the breast of the lad.

In almost every play he speaks of flowers with affection and delight.

His affection for Cassius is not a virtue to one in especial.

WORD ORIGIN

early 13c., "an emotion of the mind, passion, lust as opposed to reason," from Old French afection (12c.) "emotion, inclination, disposition; love, attraction, enthusiasm," from Latin affectionem (nominative affectio) "a relation, disposition; a temporary state; a frame, constitution," noun of state from past participle stem of afficere "to do something to, act on" (see affect (n.)). Sense developed from "disposition" to "good disposition toward" (late 14c.). Related: Affections.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR AFFECTION

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.