Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR JOG

I don't know but I'll jog along in that direction myself when it's over.

When it sticks anywhere, you'll have to try to give it a jog.

They rode at a jog, keeping as much as possible in the shadow of the timber.

She 'd not have thought it a hard lot in life just to jog on as she is.

"So I may jog back again as I came," muttered he, as he drew on his gloves.

They mounted and rode up the ridge, much of the time at a jog trot.

It was only for a few moments I imagined it, but it gave me quite a jog.

Every little while the animal had to break into a jog to catch up with her.

The children will run and pursue, and laugh for the mere movement—it does so jog their spirits.

The sinister friend was leaning over his shoulder as if to jog his elbow.

WORD ORIGIN

1540s, "to shake up and down," perhaps altered from Middle English shoggen "to shake, jolt, move with a jerk" (late 14c.), of uncertain origin. Meanings "shake," "stir up by hint or push," and "walk or ride with a jolting pace" are from 16c. The main modern sense in reference to running as training mostly dates from 1948; at first a regimen for athletes, it became a popular fad c.1967. Perhaps this sense is extended from its use in horsemanship.

Related: Jogged; jogging. As a noun from 1610s.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR JOG

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.