Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR PUSHES

He derives much from Malebranche, and it may be said he only pushes his theories to their extreme.

The momentum of the flywheel A pushes the piston upward, closing these holes.

With faltering steps, Isaac pushes on, and discerns a house.

He turns into a little public house, pushes Stafford along the passage.

He pushes past the girl, and strides into the inner apartment.

"If French pushes him, he may be shut up for a while down this way," observed Hodge.

She grabs Mary's arm and pushes her towards, the door to the hall.

She pushes him into the room so violently that he falls, coughing terribly, to the floor.

He pushes it down over his feet, and then all the top part of him shivers.

First she digs a hole, in which she places the egg and pushes it well down.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old French poulser (Modern French pousser), from Latin pulsare "to beat, strike, push," frequentative of pellere (past participle pulsus) "to push, drive, beat" (see pulse (n.1)). Meaning "promote" is from 1714; meaning "approach a certain age" is from 1937. For palatization of -s-, OED compares brush (n.1); quash. Related: Pushed; pushing.

To push (someone) around is from 1923. To push (one's) luck is from 1754. To push the envelope in figurative sense is late 1980s. To push up daisies "be dead and buried" is from World War I.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.