Synonyms for muscle

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Antonyms for muscle

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MUSCLE

In a swerve he almost stopped, every muscle of his big body trembling in affright.

The tall son of Hanover was lean of flesh, but gross in muscle.

"Ah, but he has mind as well as muscle," put in Mr. Stewart.

There was some tension of mind or muscle that kept sleep far from him.

She came up straight and tall, a concluded resolution in every muscle.

And not a muscle of his face stirred; he simply gazed into the void.

He had not touched a muscle or a muscular nerve; what then was the nature of these movements?

It was all muscle, bone, and sinew-fighting flesh in the finest condition.

It cannot digest itself; it cannot of its own accord turn into bone and muscle and blood.

Impertinence, gayety, agility, muscle—that was what women loved in men.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., from Middle French muscle "muscle, sinew" (14c.) and directly from Latin musculus "a muscle," literally "little mouse," diminutive of mus "mouse" (see mouse (n.)).

So called because the shape and movement of some muscles (notably biceps) were thought to resemble mice. The analogy was made in Greek, too, where mys is both "mouse" and "muscle," and its comb. form gives the medical prefix myo-. Cf. also Old Church Slavonic mysi "mouse," mysica "arm;" German Maus "mouse; muscle," Arabic 'adalah "muscle," 'adal "field mouse." In Middle English, lacerte, from the Latin word for "lizard," also was used as a word for a muscle.

Hence muscular and mousy are relatives, and a Middle English word for "muscular" was lacertous, "lizardy." Figurative sense of "force, violence, threat of violence" is 1930, American English. Muscle car "hot rod" is from 1969.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MUSCLE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.