Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MASS

The mass was an ornate one, though not more so than they were accustomed to at Beaulieu.

We missed our morning mass, it will do us no harm to hear Nones in the Minster.

Gone is the mass of the mountains, the stoniness of rocks, the hard solidity of iron.

In the nearer ranks we may discern the variety of ingredients that compose the mass.

I thought he was going to give that mass of flowers to me, but he did not.

Women in the mass were very displeasing to look at, and they frightened you.

And you have no notion what a mass of work he has got to get through every day.

From the outer edges of this mass men were sinking to the ground.

Then like a mass of jelly out of its mould I plopped onto my chair.

She was a wiry woman, a mass of muscles animated by an eager energy.

WORD ORIGIN

"lump, quantity, size," late 14c., from Old French masse "lump, heap, pile; crowd, large amount; ingot, bar" (11c.), and directly from Latin massa "kneaded dough, lump, that which adheres together like dough," probably from Greek maza "barley cake, lump, mass, ball," related to massein "to knead," from PIE root *mag- "to knead" (cf. Lithuanian minkyti "to knead," see macerate). Sense extended in English 1580s to "a large quantity, amount, or number." Strict sense in physics is from 1704.

As an adjective from 1733, first attested in mass meeting in American English. mass culture is from 1916 in sociology (earlier in biology); mass hysteria is from 1914; mass media is from 1923; mass movement is from 1897; mass production is from 1920; mass grave is from 1918; mass murder from 1880.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR MASS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.