multitudes

[ muhl-ti-tood, -tyood ]SEE DEFINITION OF multitudes
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR MULTITUDES

When the multitudes were not converted by the miracles, they fled terrified.

But our progress has also been owing to multitudes of smaller and less known men.

In a lofty way he received the attentions of the multitudes of strange gods.

I had seen the multitudes "loosen up," I had felt myself melt into the crowd.

The form of words is repeated by multitudes who do not care to think what they are saying.

These warm regions, you know, have multitudes of insects that we never see.

There were also, multitudes of verses and songs, in which nothing was spared.

They do so then as multitudes in which the one is not present?

For they will assault you in multitudes, and would take you captive.

The Drilgoes had broken in and trapped the multitudes that had taken refuge there.

WORD ORIGIN

early 14c., from Old French multitude (12c.) and directly from Latin multitudinem (nominative multitudo) "a great number, a crowd; the crowd, the common people," from multus "many, much" (see multi-) + suffix -tudo (see -tude). Related: Multitudes.

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.