Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR LOADS

Decent, unpretentious folks, somewhat new, but with loads of money.

Went over to the lake with all the horses, and brought the loads to the camp.

I made them unload the drays and carry the loads to firm ground.

They caught the Indian carriers, who were just easing their loads under the walls.

The men laid down their loads, and sprawled about in abandon.

One or two arose wearily and stiffly, and dragged their loads to the pile.

Mali-ya-bwana, under his directions, had undone the loads containing the lanterns.

Then we must make shauri with these people to get our loads.

The loads, covered by the tarpaulin, had been arranged in the centre of the circle.

Mali-ya-bwana considered that it was bad to leave the loads.

WORD ORIGIN

"that which is laid upon a person or beast, burden," c.1200, from Old English lad "way, course, carrying," from Proto-Germanic *laitho (cf. Old High German leita, German leite, Old Norse leið "way, course"); related to Old English lædan "to guide," from PIE *leit- "to go forth" (see lead (v.)). Sense shifted 13c. to supplant words based on lade, to which it is not etymologically connected; original association with "guide" is preserved in lodestone. Meaning "amount customarily loaded at one time" is from c.1300.

Figurative sense of "burden weighing on the mind, heart, or soul" is first attested 1590s. Meaning "amount of work" is from 1946. Colloquial loads "lots, heaps" is attested from c.1600. Phrase take a load off (one's) feet "sit down, relax" is from 1914, American English. Get a load of "take a look at" is American English colloquial, attested from 1929.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR LOADS

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.