Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR ARMY

When you kill off all your present army, you must git up a draft.

A God-in-Chief was therefore created, like the commanding general of an army.

They served the King faithfully as officers in his army and as collectors of his taxes.

They belonged to the times when 30,000 men were an army, and when campaigns were spent in sieges.

He beat the army in the field, and then let the fortresses drop one by one into his hands.

The purchase of official positions in the army was thus abolished.

He had made up his mind to put an end to the purchase of commissions in the army.

He was more than usually polite to the major: he was in the army, the goal of his aspiration!

She was terrible as an army with banners; fair as the sea or the sunset.

The army, or the hosts, were called the army of God, or the hosts of God.

WORD ORIGIN

late 14c., "armed expedition," from Old French armée (14c.) "armed troop, armed expedition," from Medieval Latin armata "armed force," from Latin armata, fem. of armatus "armed, equipped, in arms," past participle of armare "to arm," literally "act of arming," related to arma "tools, arms" (see arm (n.2)). Originally used of expeditions on sea or land; the specific meaning "land force" first recorded 1786. Transferred meaning "host, multitude" is c.1500.

The Old English words were here (still preserved in derivatives like harrier), from PIE *kor- "people, crowd;" and fierd, with an original sense of "expedition," from faran "travel." In spite of etymology, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, here generally meant "invading Vikings" and fierd was used for the local militias raised to fight them.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR ARMY

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.