Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR SEA

As you do not propose to follow the sea, it will not be worth while to go as cabin-boy.

Had the dead come back from the bottom of the sea to expose him?

He, too, plunged into the sea, and Bunsby and the captain were left alone.

The two bent their steps to the shore, and looked out to sea.

Then they launched the ship's boat, in which Bates had come to the island, and put out to sea.

He thought I was at the bottom of the sea, and the receipt with me.

It seemed like one risen from the dead, for he supposed him lying at the bottom of the sea.

He came home with me, and, far from having perished at sea, is now alive and well.

The immense pools in the Phillips were as salt as sea water.

We camped near the sea, a few miles to the westward of Cape Pasley.

WORD ORIGIN

Old English "sheet of water, sea, lake, pool," from Proto-Germanic *saiwaz (cf. Old Saxon seo, Old Frisian se, Middle Dutch see, Swedish sjö), of unknown origin, outside connections "wholly doubtful" [Buck]. Meaning "large quantity" (of anything) is from c.1200. Meaning "dark area of the moon's surface" is attested from 1660s (see mare (n.2)).

Germanic languages also use the general Indo-European word (represented by English mere (n.)), but have no firm distinction between "sea" and "lake," either by size, by inland or open, or by salt vs. fresh. This may reflect the Baltic geography where the languages are thought to have originated. The two words are used more or less interchangeably in Germanic, and exist in opposite senses (e.g. Gothic saiws "lake," marei "sea;" but Dutch zee "sea," meer "lake"). Cf. also Old Norse sær "sea," but Danish , usually "lake" but "sea" in phrases. German See is "sea" (fem.) or "lake" (masc.). The single Old English word glosses Latin mare, aequor, pontus, pelagus, and marmor.

Phrase sea change "transformation" is attested from 1610, first in Shakespeare ("The Tempest," I.ii). Sea anemone is from 1742; sea legs is from 1712; sea level from 1806; sea urchin from 1590s. At sea in the figurative sense of "perplexed" is attested from 1768, from literal sense of "out of sight of land" (c.1300).

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR SEA

briny

adjectivesalty
Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.