agglomerate

[ verb uh-glom-uh-reyt; adjective, noun uh-glom-er-it, -uh-reyt ]SEE DEFINITION OF agglomerate

Synonyms for agglomerate

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Antonyms for agglomerate

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Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.

EXAMPLES FROM THE WEB FOR AGGLOMERATE

Let this be as it may, we found nothing of any value in the agglomerate in which the Egyptians had excavated.

Rocks of an agglomerate type are well shown in the walls of Gibraltar.

It was an agglomerate, a horde, not an army, and nobody but he could have wielded it.

The residue may also be employed, either alone or mixed with some agglomerate, in the construction of garden paths and the like.

The vast quantities of ice pouring over the precipice would freeze together, agglomerate, and form an ice-bridge.

The very fine particles show a slight tendency to agglomerate.

The phenomena presented by the necks of intrusive rock do not differ from those characteristic of agglomerate or tuff necks.

The men of the left thought of "the people" as merely the agglomerate of the citizens composing it.

It is an agglomerate made of pebbles and cement, the pebbles being elongated as if by pressure.

Unfortunately, the moral tone of this agglomerate population is deplorable, and money is spent in a reckless way.

WORD ORIGIN

1680s, from Latin agglomeratus, past participle of agglomerare "to wind or add onto a ball," from ad- "to" (see ad-) + glomerare "wind up in a ball," from glomus (genitive glomeris) "ball of yarn," from PIE root *glem-. Related: Agglomerated; agglomerating.

MORE RELATED WORDS FOR AGGLOMERATE

Roget's 21st Century Thesaurus, Third Edition Copyright © 2013 by the Philip Lief Group.